Monthly Archives: March 2011

Learn About Additional Insured Issues And Indemnification Agreements And Get CLE!

Is your company an additional insured under another company’s insurance policies? Does your company issue certificates of insurance? Do you deal with indemnity agreements? Do you know whether indemnity agreements are covered by insurance? Would you like to learn the answers to these questions? Of course you would.

You’d like to hear about this from a commercial litigator and insurance coverage attorneys, wouldn’t you?

Plus, you’d like CLE credit for listening, wouldn’t you?

Well, say no more!

If you’re looking for all of that and more, organized and hosted by my good friends at HB Litigation Conferences, please join me for the:

Additional Insured Issues & Indemnification Agreements Teleconference

Date: April 14, 2011
Time: 2:00-3:40 PM, ET
Price: $169*
CLE Credit: 1.5-2 CLE Credits

  • Indemnification agreements
    • May a company be indemnified for its own negligence?
  • Additional insured coverage
    • How does a company become an additional insured?
    • What is the scope of additional insured coverage?
    • Who pays the deductible?
    • Is there insurance coverage for contractual indemnity agreements?
  • Assumption of liability
    • How does it differ from an indemnity agreement?
    • Does it survive a bankruptcy?

3:30 Question and Answer Session

3:40 Adjourn

Faculty
Timothy Delahunt, Esq., Kenney Shelton Liptak Nowak LLP, Buffalo, NY
Scott Godes, Esq., [formerly] Counsel Dickstein Shapiro LLP, Washington, DC
Michael Kurtis, Esq., Nelson Levine deLuca & Horst, Blue Bell, PA
Adam Shienvold, Esq., Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC, Harrisburg

Register Now!

Download the Registration Form and mail/fax/email it to us or call us at (484) 324-2755.

*This is valid for only one connection per firm/company location. Multiple attendees can listen in to the conference on that one connection for no additional charge (an additional CLE fee of $25 per additional listener will apply for those pursuing CLE credit, names required in advance). If more than one connection is used, you will be billed after the conference $169 per each additional connection used.

Disclaimer:

This blog is for informational purposes only. This may be considered attorney advertising in some states. The opinions on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of the author’s law firm and/or the author’s past and/or present clients. By reading it, no attorney-client relationship is formed. If you want legal advice, please retain an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction. The opinions expressed here belong only the individual contributor(s). © All rights reserved. 2011.

Note:  as a speaker at the conference, I will not be charged a fee related to the conference.

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“Is Your Company Prepared for Cyber Risk?”

Looking for a great article discussing cyber risk, the costs of cyber risk and data breaches, how companies and corporate boards are dealing with cyber risk, and a discussion about cyber insurance?  Then you should click here, to read a great article in Corporate Board Member Magazine, written by Chris Costanzo, “Is Your Company Prepared for Cyber Risk?

The article’s lede is:

If directors think about cybercrime at all, they are apt to consider cases like Heartland Payment Systems or TJX Cos., in which hackers exposed millions of customer records. Actually, they should be contemplating Google, which accused an electronic spy ring based in China of unleashing sophisticated cyber attacks against its computer systems early last year.

The Google case is emblematic of a new type of cybercrime that is stealthier and potentially more harmful than the massive data breaches that were front-page news a few years ago. When hackers steal customer data, they do it quickly and move on, leaving companies with the administrative hassle of notifying customers.

It goes on to quote several thought leaders on cyber risk, including people who consult on cyber risk, remediation for data breaches and cyber threats, and lawyers who work on the area of insurance coverage for cyber risks.  Mr. Costanzo was nice enough to quote me in the article:

That’s not to say companies shouldn’t explore other options. “If you haven’t bought a cyber policy, you should absolutely look to other policies to see what other coverage could be available there,” says Scott Godes, [formerly] counsel at Washington, D.C.-based Dickstein Shapiro. Existing case law backs up the use of general liability or errors and omissions policies to cover cyber breaches, Godes says. “But I would be loathe to say, ‘Don’t buy a cyber policy,’ particularly as insurance companies get more savvy,” he adds.

The entire article is a great read if you have an interest in cyber security and cyber risk.  Click here to read the entire article, “Is Your Company Prepared for Cyber Risk?

Disclaimer:

This blog is for informational purposes only. This may be considered attorney advertising in some states. The opinions on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of the author’s law firm and/or the author’s past and/or present clients. By reading it, no attorney-client relationship is formed. If you want legal advice, please retain an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction. The opinions expressed here belong only the individual contributor(s). © All rights reserved. 2011.

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